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May 31st, 2009 § Enter your password to view comments. § permalink

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We’ll hitchhike our way…

May 31st, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Sign of the times: a [group of hitch-hikers](http://the789project.eu/), planning a mass hitch this summer, need to agree on a European destination that will give them the least possible amount of hassle with visas and the like. Their choice: Ukraine. Yes, 500 people will be thumbing their way to Odessa because Shengen bureaucracy is so visitor-unfriendly.
This nugget from the [Berlin Beach Camp](http://www.berlinbeachcamp.org/), an annual get-together of [couchsurfers](http://couchsurfing.com/) at a lake near the city.

38 Degrees

May 26th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

[38 Degrees](http://38degrees.org.uk/) has just launched. It’s aiming to become a UK counterpart to Avaaz: a large non-party campaign organization built around a stonking big email list, picking winnable campaigns and feeding their supporters with small, easy ways of contributing.
They’re kicking off with an attempt to bounce of the MP expenses kerfuffle to give constituents the power to recall MPs. So far they’re pretty vague about what this would entail, and I’m not entirely clear on the benefits. Sure, a few immensely corrupt MPs might be removed. But I dread to think how many local campaigns could end up diverting their energies into unwinnable attempts to remove their MPs.
I’m mildly concerned about a few aspects of their site: the [petition page](http://www.38degrees.org.uk/page/s/recall) doesn’t make it clear whether 38 Degrees will hold onto your email, and they aren’t offering any email address to get in touch with them. But it’s early days yet, and these are things that will doubtless get ironed out quickly. Plus David Babbs is involved, so I already have a fair amount of unpleasantly old-boyish confidence in them.

nuum wars

May 25th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Simon “[Energy Flash](http://ohuiginn.net/mt/2009/04/book_energy_flash.html)” Reynolds, K-Punk and friends have been having an interesting (and intriguingly nerdish) discussion on ‘nuum’, or the ‘hardore continuum’, the family of British music descending from rave and hardcore, and covering the range of jungle, garage, grime, and a thousand subgenre cousins. A blogger-heavy [conference](http://nuum.org/events/the-hardcore-continuum-a-discussion) at the University of East London has given them license to go into depth. Simon’s posts ([1](http://energyflashbysimonreynolds.blogspot.com/2009/05/nuum-and-its-discontents-1-centripetal.html) [2](http://energyflashbysimonreynolds.blogspot.com/2009/05/nuum-and-its-discontents-2-genre-versus.html) [3](http://energyflashbysimonreynolds.blogspot.com/2009/05/nuum-and-its-discontents-3-wot-u-call.html) [4](http://energyflashbysimonreynolds.blogspot.com/2009/05/nuum-and-its-discontents-4-party.html)) are unashamedly, delightfully, high-falutin':
>You could see rave as a whole, and the nuum in particular, as modernism’s last stand, or unexpected comeback, long after the ideals of modernism had been abandoned, eroded, questioned, everywhere else….Miraculously holding pomo at bay, the nuum preserved within itself, within its own partially cordoned off space, the heightened temporality of peak-era modernism: a sensation of hurtling into the future.
K-Punk, incidentally, has a nice little [defense](http://www.factmagazine.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2437&Itemid=105) of criticism.

Thomas Bayrle

May 16th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

More art today, this time Thomas Bayrle. He’s the kind of artist who must have had a fit when Photoshop came along, after he’d spent decades making striking poster images out of identical repeating components. I’ve not yet found anything here to keep my attention more than a few seconds; maybe there are subtleties somewhere in the details, but I’ve not been able to find them. Still, quite pleasant at first glance:


The need for squats

May 15th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

A few weeks ago I joined [Tau](http://taumh.es/) and several thousand others on a [demonstration](http://aka.blogsport.de/2009/03/15/freiraum-demo-14-3-09/) across Berlin, in support of squats and other free spaces. I promised to write about it — and then repeatedly failed to, stymied by the vastness and importance of the topic.
Berlin’s squatters mostly feel they’re fighting a rearguard action, defending decades-old social centres from the inexorable march of private investors.
But I’m, for once, more optimistic than most, and more convinced that squats are an essential part of the urban ecology. Squats are to a city what strikes are to a firm, valuable more as threat than as activity. They challenge the belief that individual buildings in a city can function as private property, without obligations to their neighbours. A building without its surroundings is purposeless, worth no more in itself than its counterparts standing abandoned across East Germany. City buildings can only exist symbiotically, and when one is left empty it harms the others. That harm is fundamentally social, but it can also easily be translated to financial terms as the loss of house value.
Naturally, I don’t think every building should be squatted, or that existing squats should be inviolable. All else aside, a little tension keeps the squatters honest. The squats that survive are the ones which contribute to the life of the city.
So I don’t mind that Berlin’s squats are under pressure. They’re always under pressure, and so they should be. But for every squat evicted, another deserves to be created (at least!). And I still believe that it will happen.

Irish dancing in Minsk

May 13th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Every guest brings some story to the [corner house](http://berlin.projectvolunteering.net/), so whenever I visit I’m confronted by some unexpected mini-world.
A fortnight ago, it was the popularity of Irish dancing in Belarus, as a troupe of dancers from Minsk passed by on their way home from a competition in Duisburg. Apparently step-dancing got started in Belarus at the start of the decade, imported from Moscow(!). It’s since grown rapidly, with teachers brought in from Ireland, and students traveling to international events. Apparently, the Irish dominance at these events is rapidly declining, with dancers from Eastern Europe creeping up the leader-boards.
Maybe it shouldn’t have been so surprising, beyond the surreal cross-cultural charm of saturday-night Slavic-Celtic jigs in a Berlin apartment. It fits right into the whole sprawling North European obsession with the middle ages, something you can find everywhere from Norwegian metal bands to Russian forest-lovers. It’s very apparent in Berlin, and presumably much stronger elsewhere in Germany. I’ve not ventured out to any of the numerous re-enactment fairs — an immense cottage industry, or perhaps more accurately a communal labour of love. Being more at home among cities than trees, I content myself with the Wednesday-night medieval music sessions in [Arcanoa](http://www.arcanoa.de/).
The Belarusian trend is clearly part of this; the one [English-language description](http://medievalbelarus.org/eng/?page=perfomances&p=dancperf) I could find is on a site devoted to “Medieval Belarus”.
As for the corner-house, it has lately been packed out by a [family of 12](http://blogs.bootsnall.com/kiwifamily/) making their way on a massive year-long journey across eurasia.

UK election leaflets, archived

May 12th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Linkies! [The Straight Choice](http://www.thestraightchoice.org/) is a new website collecting campaign leaflets from UK elections.
If it takes off, this could become a very useful resource. Leaflets ofen show campaigns at their most brutal and desperate. Enhancing the collective memory of what politicians have done is a great way of holding them to account. That goes for the outrageous behaviour that comes out during elections (who [remembers](http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5391/is_200410/ai_n21358424/) the Tory slogan “if you want a nigger for a neighbour, vote Liberal or Labour.”? Would pictures help?). More importantly, it goes for the little promises that are made and then ignored, safe in the knowledge that what’s said in the campaign vanishes soon afterwards.
Of course, libraries do have collections of this stuff; there’s one at [LSE](http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/archive/gutoho/election_ephemera.htm), and another in Bristol. But I doubt they get much attention, except from academic historians and the occasional zealous party worker. Online images have much greater potential, provided the intial enthusiasm is enough to start it snowballing.

Stéphane Blanquet

May 11th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

There haven’t been nearly enough pictures around here lately. So here’s something by [Stéphane Blanquet](http://www.blanquet.com/journal/), a youngish French artist producing comics, book and CD covers, and a solid supply of drawings. They range from [Steadman-esque sketches](http://www.blanquet.com/journal/images/mars/rasage05.jpg), through an [outright terrifying](http://www.blanquet.com/journal/images/mars/capote.jpg) fake condom label, through to the kind of intricate and gently surreal composition that I’ll reliably fall for:

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Histories of momentary places

May 10th, 2009 § 2 comments § permalink

My hippie heart is continually entranced by communal living spaces. [Permanent Hospitality Berlin](http://berlin.projectvolunteering.net/), the one I’m closest to, is firmly entrenched as my favourite place in the world.
But, magical as it may be, the odds are that it won’t exist in fifty years’ time. Such places depend entirely on the personalities and culture involved, which change in a matter of months or less. Most disintegrate or are reabsorbed into normality, and only a very [few](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freetown_Christiania) walk the cultural tightrope for decades.
So these projects are reinvented and forgotten year by year. Permanent Hospitality has made a point of documenting itself, but I’m not convinced that words can capture any more than the basic institutional structure of such a place. It takes a work of genius such as The Electric Kool-aid Acid Test to get inside the heads of a culture (and it becomes harder, not easier, when the group are less self-consciously exhibitionist than the Merry Pranksters).
Usually, the only way of getting at the spirit of the place is through the minds of the people touched by it. I am inordinately excited by the knowledge that the hundreds of people who have encountered the project are now spread in tiny pockets across the world, bringing their idea of it wider into the project.
All of which is by way of introduction to [this short essay](http://www.monochrom.at/hacking-the-spaces/) on the [hacker spaces](http://hackerspaces.org) movement, which shares at least a little with the ideology of other intentional communities. I’ll leave the main thrust for another day (briefly: I disagree that being self-consciously ‘political’ is essential, or even necessarily helpful), but I entirely agree with the call for oral history:

To get there we really need a more explicit sense and understanding of the history of what we are doing, of the political approaches and demands that went into it long ago and that still are there, hidden in what we do right now.


So to start off we would like to organize some workshops in the hackerspaces where we can learn about the philosophical, historical and other items that we need to get back in our lives. Theory is a toolkit to analyze and deconstruct the world.

Not new, of course: once the [Whole Earth Catalog](http://www.wholeearth.com/index.php), now [worldchanging](http://worldchanging.com/) and a flotilla of websites provide the maps. But, especially given the noticeable age-segregation of so many projects, I feel an increasing need to pick the brains of greybears (and…erm…greybeardesses) who have been through it all before.
[ETA: As usual, Mike adds a [comment](http://ohuiginn.net/mt/2009/05/histories_of_momentary_places.html#comments) that’s considerably more informative than the post itself. Mike, you rock.]

UK Prison population

May 5th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

As [Rachel](http://palmer1984.livejournal.com/278208.html) highlights, Labour govenrment has massively raised the UK’s prison population:
1997: 61,000

2008: 81,000
It works out at somewhere around 150 people in jail per 100,000 population. That’s higher than China, Burma or Saudi Arabia, although admitttedly only a fifth of the USA.

Police State UK

May 4th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Just a link today – to [Police State UK](http://policestate.co.uk), a new blog “intended as an information source for people who are concerned about the direction politics and policing have taken in the UK”. Not so much there yet, but I’m sure it will continue to grow over time. After all, there’s no shortage of material.

recognition and redistribution

May 3rd, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

[Nancy Fraser](http://www.eurozine.com/authors/fraser.html) isn’t a name I’d come across until last week, when I [read](http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2009-04-21-eurozinerev-en.html) a fascinating [interview](http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2009-04-21-fraser-en.html) with her for Eurozine.
Fraser is a political-scientist-cum-philosopher, who has attempted to sum up the political culture of the last few decades in a shift from ‘redistribution’ to ‘recognition’. That is, people stopped mobilizing around inequalities of wealth and power, and instead dedicated their energies to demanding respect for their identities within the same market structure. So out went tax-and-spent, benefits were cut, the rich got richer and the poor stayed poor. But there were massive sttrides forward in feminism, gay rights, reducing racism, and the like. [I’m butchering her ideas.
I’m obviously butchering Fraser’s ideas here, but her generalisation holds up surprisingly well. From Tony Blair to the culture wars to the issues exciting student campaigners, the left gave up on fighting economic inequality. Those who did keep a focus on redistribution — notably, the unions — were depicted as dinosaurs.
This ties in to the soul-searching happening on [Liberal Conspiracy](http://www.liberalconspiracy.org/2009/04/21/the-lefts-response-to-the-financial-crisis-is-indeed-weak/) and elsewhere. It’s hardly surprising that we have nothing to say about the financial crisis, if we’ve spent the past 2 decades looking the other way when it comes to poverty.

Transparency isn’t Bunk

May 2nd, 2009 § 0 comments §